Sound Design Exercise – Building a Soundscape

<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/118366432″>Reign – Alex, Erin &amp; Rita</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user5511308″>Middlesex University Films</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

For this exercise, we had to take a short animated film without it’s original sound and create a new soundscape for it from scratch. This was a challenging assignment as extensive Foley recording was needed in order to create an engaging and evocative soundscape.

I ended up working with Rita and Erin on this project and together we came up with a list of sound effects we wanted for each specific action that occurs within the film and took that into the recording studio and set to work.

After spending a lengthy amount of time in the recording studio, we managed to put together a soundscape for the short animated film that we were proud of.

At the screening however, our use of music in our film wasn’t looked positively on. We decided to include music into the film in order to create a sense of humour, using music from the Django Unchained soundtrack. Such songs we used included:

The brief did not state that we could not use music at all so we decided to include these songs in our film in conjunction with all the additional sound effects we created in order to create a cinematic soundscape. I liked the effect the music had overall in establishing a mood although I do agree with the sentiment one of classmates made in that the use of the first song lasted throughout the film and made it feel tiring to listen to as there wasn’t a change in tone or style when something happened on screen that would have warranted a change, such as the main character of the film picking up a stick and cutting through branches.

Looking back, perhaps we could have used the music and other sound effects to directly react to what was happenign on screen. If we had done so, perhaps we could have created a more interactive soundscape which would have made it more fun to watch.

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Filed under MDA2400 - The Filmmaker's Vision: Style & Theory

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